Telemetry Systems, Valuable to Us All

Telemetry systems in this day and age are often made from a series of simple off the shelf communication products. While many of them may be similar, there are definitely some unique configurations and applications requirements depending on the type of telemetry being done.

A basic telemetry system is usually said to be made up of two basic components: the airborne and the ground systems. The truth is, though, that either or both may be on the air, on the ground, or even in the water. If, for instance, information on an airplane about the atmospheric pressure is being received, then both of the parts of the telemetry system are going to be airborne. To be more accurate, then, a telemetry system consists of a transmitter and a receiver unit.

One of the most popular or well-known types of telemetry system are wildlife systems. A transmitter is placed on an animal that is to be studied. For instance, a bat may be tracked to see where it travels each night to eat. The system consists first of a tiny transmitter that is attached to the bat. On the end of the conservationist studying the information would be a receiver that would get the information that would tell them where the bat was at any given time. The entire process is a telemetry system.

A system can also be used to track an asteroid, check the weather in the North Pole, measure the height of a mountain on the ocean floor, or measure a volcano’s activity. Any time data must be measured from a distance, a telemetry system must be used.

Telemetry systems must be used by scientists, naturalists, and engineers alike for the good of their professions. Much of the information we get every day whether it is from space, the ocean floor, or atop a mountain comes from these systems making them a vital part of the culture of information. Next time you see new information from afar, remember that a telemetry system may have brought it to you.