Migraine Facts: Manipal Nurse

Migraines are more dangerous than simply hard headache.

Here’s some insight into this legitimate medical condition that affects nearly 45 million people.

So you go into your boss’ office and tell her you have a headache and that you need to go home. Chances are, you can already predict the reaction – rolling eyes, a sigh, maybe even a chuckle.

“Suck it up and get back to work.”

Unfortunately, millions of people suffer from headaches so bad that concentrating on something like work can make the pain unbearable. And it’s especially true for migraine sufferers. “Stop migraines before they stop you!” is the slogan, and it couldn’t be more to the point.

Migraines are more dangerous than simply hard headache.

Migraine headaches affect 30 million people. You probably know someone who suffers from them, or might even endure them yourself. The good news is they’re preventable!

Migraine characteristics include:

  • Pain typically on one side of the head
  • Pain has a pulsating or throbbing quality
  • Moderate to intense pain affecting daily activities
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Sensitivity to light and sound
  • Attacks last four to 72 hours, sometimes longer
  • Visual disturbances or aura
  • Exertion such as climbing stairs makes headache worse

Many factors can trigger migraine attacks such as alteration of sleep-wake cycle; missing or delaying a meal; medications that cause a swelling of the blood vessels; daily or near-daily use of medications designed for relieving headache attacks; bright lights, sunlight, and fluorescent lights; TV and movie viewing; certain foods; and excessive noise.

In addition, stress and/or underlying depression are important trigger factors that can be diagnosed and treated adequately in order to help prevent migraines.

The bottom line: Prevent the aforementioned trigger factors for a more peaceful head!

 

About Nurse 69 Articles

When I think about all the patients and their loved ones that I have worked with over the years, I know most of them don’t remember me nor I them. But I do know that I gave a little piece of myself to each of them and they to me and those threads make up the beautiful tapestry in my mind that is my career in nursing.